English porcelain dating

To the collector the mark has greater importance, for not only can he trace the manufacturer of any marked object, but he can also ascertain the approximate date of manufacture and in several cases the exact year of production, particularly in the case of 19th and 20th century wares from the leading firms which employed private dating systems.With the increasing use of ceramic marks in the 19th century, a large proportion of European pottery and porcelain can be accurately identified and often dated.eramic marks are applied in four basic ways: incised, impressed, painted, printed.he object of a ceramic trade mark is to enable at least the retailer to know the name of the manufacturer of the object, so that re-orders, etc., can be correctly addressed.In the case of the larger firms the mark also has publicity value and shows the buyer that the object was made by a long-established firm with a reputation to uphold; such clear name marks as Minton, Wedgwood, Royal Crown Derby and Royal Worcester are typical examples.

Their overall plan imitated the Chinese, who had already developed porcelain factories for the production of vessels explicitly designed for export.

Using the Spode archive and published books you can learn about different backstamps (marks) on Spode pieces.

This though can only be a guide to a date - it is not an exact science and some backstamps were used for many, many years.

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On smaller items like animals and birds, there will not always be room for the the three Royal Towers - they will be marked B&G in blue and the stoneware in black.